Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats – Tickets – Georgia Theatre – Athens, GA – April 25th, 2017

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats

Seratones

Tue · April 25, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Georgia Theatre

$30.00 - $35.00

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This event is 18 and over

Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats - (Set time: 10:30 PM)
Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats
Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats practically explodes with deep, primal and ecstatic soulfulness. This stunning work isn't just soul stirring, it's also soul baring, and the combination is absolutely devastating to behold. You don't just listen to this record—you experience it. So it's entirely fitting that the self-titled album will bear the iconic logo of Stax Records, because at certain moments Rateliff seems to be channeling soul greats like Otis Redding and Sam & Dave.
But as this gifted multi-instrumentalist honors the legacy of the legendary Memphis label, he's also setting out into audacious new territory.

Those who were beguiled by In Memory of Loss, Rateliff's folky, bittersweet 2010 Rounder album, will be in for an initial shock when they spin Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats. But when you delve beneath the rawboned surface of the new album's wall-rattling presentation, with its deep-gut grooves, snaky guitars, churning Hammond and irresistible horns, you'll find that same sensitive, introspective dude, who bravely tells it like it is, breaking through his reticence to expose often harsh truths about the life he's lived, the people he's hurt and the despair he's struggled with. The difference between the two albums is that the Nights Sweats' funkiness insulates the starkly confessional nature of Rateliff's songs while at the same time underscoring their emotional extremes.

The place where Rateliff is coming from is intensely real and intimate. Doing what he does is an act of bravery. "These songs are about the struggles I've had in my life—drinking too much, that kind of crap," he says with characteristic candor, punctuating the admission with a rueful laugh. "And then the relationships we all have. I'm not a great communicator in my personal life, so it's funny to be writing songs that say the things that I'm never very good at saying. It's taken me a long time to figure that out. I'm trying to be a better communicator, but it's horribly awkward—it's awful—to tell somebody something you know is gonna hurt their feelings. I've always been one to go, oh, I'll just eat this one; it'll be okay."
As the band blazes away on the soul-rock rave-up "I Need Never Get Old," the visceral "Howling at Nothing" and the supercharged "Trying So Hard Not to Know" (key line: "Who gives a damn and very few can"), which open the album with a sustained outpouring of torrid intensity, Rateliff is opening himself up emotionally as well as physically, the raw grit in his voice conveying anguish and hope in equal measure. The buoyant immediacy of the music makes the hard truths embedded in the songs easier to swallow than it would be in Rateliff's other primary mode—a solitary guy with a guitar, the brim of his baseball cap pulled down, putting his heart and guts on the line without the protection of his simpatico cohorts. Make no mistake, these songs would stop you in their tracks presented in that naked way as well, but the additional layers of soulfulness provided by the Night Sweats—its core comprising guitarist Joseph Pope III, drummer Patrick Meese and keyboardist Mark Shusterman—bring a convergence of intensities, musical and psychological, to the performances.
Seratones - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Seratones
Get Gone, the potent debut album by the Shreveport, Louisiana natives in Seratones, makes a strong case that this little-known corner of the state is fertile ground, musically speaking. A.J. Haynes (vocals), Connor Davis (guitar), Adam Davis (bass) and Jesse Gabriel (drums) serve up a combination of Southern musicality, garage rock ferocity, and general badassery.

Haynes’s powerful singing voice, first honed at Brownsville Baptist Church in Columbia, Louisiana at age 6, rings across every track. Davis’s bass and Gabriel’s playing propel every song with the grit, energy, and rawness of punk, the feeling of soul, and occasionally, a little jazz swing. The other Davis offers a clinic in guitar riffs, from swaggering blues to searing interstellar leads.

Recorded at Dial Back Sound studios in Mississippi, Get Gone is all live takes, a portrait of the Seratones in their element. Add the soul and swagger of a juke joint with the electricity coursing through a basement DIY show, and you’d begin to approach the experience of seeing this foursome live. The well-paced, multi-faceted set showcases a band dedicated to sonic exploration. “Don’t Need It,” which opens with a muscular swing and tight guitar lines, builds into a monster finish with a nasty corkscrew of a guitar line. “Sun,” a brawny thrasher, courses with huge, raw voltage riffs. “Chandelier,” a mid-tempo burner and vocal workout by Haynes, goes from croon to a crescendo that would shake any crystals hanging from the rafters.

Shared history in the city’s music scene brought the Seratones together a few years ago. All four had played together with one or another in various local punk bands, bonding through all-ages basement shows, gigs at skate parks and BBQ joints, and late nights listening to jazz and blues records. In a city of multiple genres, no fixed musical identity and a flood of cover bands, these adventurous musicians carved out their own path, personifying the do-it-yourself ethos. The group was quickly recognized after forming, winning the Louisiana Music Prize in 2013.

“Shreveport is always shifting its identity,” says Haynes. “You can do a lot of different things when it seems like every band is its own genre.”

Seratones’s music, created with collaborative songwriting and spontaneous creativity, is certainly their own, due perhaps in part to Shreveport’s unique sonic geography. The city sits at a nexus roughly equidistant from Memphis soul, Mississippi Delta Blues, and New Orleans jazz, with Texas swing located just over the nearby state border. The band’s sound draws from those touch points and more, ranging from Black Sabbath’s Paranoid to Kind of Blue. They’ll happily connect the dots between Ornette Coleman and Jello Biafra.

Seratones have different names for the amalgamation of styles found on their debut: Their own “expression of freedom,” music that’s “all about waking people up,” a safe space to feel what you want. However you choose to describe it, Get Gone is unexpected and unbowed, a head-snapping showcase of the twin pillars of Southern music, restlessness and resourcefulness.
Venue Information:
Georgia Theatre
215 N. Lumpkin St
Athens, GA, 30601
http://www.georgiatheatre.com/